The Rise of Self-Branding Fashion

| By: Couture USA

The Rise of Self-Branding Fashion
A fluorescent pink fur coat worn with obscenely huge sunglasses... sneakers and an evening dress... Instagram has ushered in the age of self-branding through fashion. Our world is chock-full of masterful, self-anointed style stars who use their looks to garner thousands of followers._x000D_ _x000D_ Given the current climate, it's totally understandable why graphic tees and 60s-inspired embroidery are so hot right now. After all, they translate great onto screens and speak without saying a word. And with the overriding power of social media threatening to usurp an institution like Fashion Week, no one can afford to be Insta-unfriendly._x000D_ _x000D_ When it comes to self-branding fashion though, what's so different about today's street style stars than say, early 1980s Debbie Harry? The bottom line is that they all articulate themselves through unique stand-out looks that have become synonymous with who they are._x000D_ _x000D_  _x000D_
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Lita Debbie and Joan. Pic @christein

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A post shared by Blondie (@blondieofficial) on

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_x000D_  _x000D_ _x000D_ The difference is that Debbie Harry's look communicated a belonging to the punk scene, whereas today's style stars are chameleons who aren't committed to any one subculture. In fact, in the last ten years we've witnessed the death of subcultures._x000D_ _x000D_ Post World War II, the Teddy Boys of the 1950s, the Hippies of the 1960s, and the punk rockers of the 1970s were sharply delineated social groups with their own music, stores, and bars. They stood out to make statements about and against mainstream society through music, art, and written works. Now though, anyone can rock a Led Zeppelin tee from Forever 21, and not even have heard Stairway to Heaven._x000D_ _x000D_  _x000D_
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Details on point 👌👌👌 @karlaferns (Shop link in bio)

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A photo posted by forever21 (@forever21) on

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_x000D_ _x000D_  _x000D_ _x000D_ The freedom to wear iconography from a variety of subcultures is opening new avenues of self-expression. The death of subcultures means that no one is tied to one look or social scene. Hippie Boho one day, 1970's-era Bianca Jagger the next, fashionistas can cherry-pick their inspirations and build a custom style that's intrinsic to their brand. _x000D_ _x000D_ It's ingenious in its happenstance, because self-branding is able to adapt so easily to any trend that pops up, and the highest earning influencers are always the ones who respond the quickest. But it begs the question: will they run out of fashion statements to make, or will style globalization be the self-branding fashionista's saving grace?_x000D_ _x000D_  _x000D_ _x000D_
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_x000D_ _x000D_ Comme des Garcons' The Ceremony of Separation FW15, photo by PAOLO ROVERSI, head lace and make up by Julien D'ys A post shared by Comme des Garcons OFFICIAL (@commedesgarcons) on _x000D_
_x000D_ _x000D_ _x000D_ _x000D_ Perhaps non-Western fashion is the final frontier for US style influencers. Japanese designers have long been pioneering unorthodox silhouettes, but their boundary-pushing looks haven't quite hit US streets yet. However, this year's Met Ball exhibit will center around Rei Kawabuko's Comme des Garcons label, and based on industry buzz, this year's Tokyo Fashion Week might be the biggest yet._x000D_ _x000D_ As we evolve into a global society, self-branding fashion can only continue as we all vie to be seen. The emergence of high-earning fashion influencers has led to style saturation on our feeds and a need to push boundaries further than ever. Unusual silhouettes like Kawabuko's might be the natural evolution for street style stars, and seeing them on the streets would be undoubtedly riveting, don't you think?_x000D_ _x000D_  _x000D_ _x000D_  _x000D_ _x000D_ *Feature image courtesy of Peter T via Flickr

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