The History of Tiffany and Co.'s Elsa Peretti

| By: Alex Camille Admin

The History of Tiffany and Co.'s Elsa Peretti

Tiffany and Company, founded in 1837, has been in the hearts and collections of jewelry lovers for more than 179 years now. Charles Lewis Tiffany and John B. Young couldn’t have possibly foreseen the beloved and honored legacy they’d leave behind with the Tiffany and Co. brand, but their designs have retained their standing as top of the line for decades. However, diversifying collections and switching things up has always been what the Tiffany and Co. brand is about. As a result, they’ve worked with many artists and designers, such as Picasso’s daughter, Paloma Picasso, Jean Schlumberger, Francesca Amfitheatof and Elsa Peretti. Of these designers, Elsa Peretti has long been a customer favorite at Couture USA—so we’re taking a look at her history to see how she became one of Tiffany and Co.’s most beloved creators.

The Making of Elsa Peretti

Elsa Peretti’s history with the brand goes back to 1974, when she began her longstanding collaboration that resulted in the creation of many of Tiffany and Co.’s most iconic designs. However, Peretti’s ties to the fashion and design world began long before her collaboration with Tiffany.

Born in Florence, Italy in 1940, Peretti’s history as a fashion model launched her into the luxury world in Italy and New York, where she became a part of the Studio 54 entourage. Eventually, she transitioned into the design world by creating unique pieces under her own name or for brands like Halston, Oscar de la Renta and Giorgio di Sant’ Angelo.

With a modeling career marked by being featured in Vogue and with iconic photographs taken next to Salvador Dali, Peretti never seemed to have a lack of luxury and jet-setting in her lifestyle. Though known for her wild lifestyle as a model both in Italy and New York, Peretti was able to transition into a renowned designer whose collections earned her a Coty award in 1971.

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And the rest, as they say, was history.

Elsa Peretti’s Designs

Just a few short years after winning a Coty award, Peretti began her professional relationship with Tiffany and Co. in 1974. As a result of her close relationship with friend and designer Roy Halston Frowic, her introduction to the Tiffany brand resulted in an immediate collaboration that has lasted to this day.

Known for her unique silhouettes, Peretti designed Tiffany pieces that have now become synonymous with love, minimalism and luxury. Her “Open Heart” collection, which features sleek heart designs strung from delicate chains or ropes, has been a bestseller since its release.

Another fan-favorite is her Bone collection, such as the Bone Cuff pieces that have been a definite customer favorite as minimalism is currently on-trend and as Peretti’s designs are able to transcend seasons throughout the year. Similarly, her minimalist Bean collection has given jewelry-lovers who are looking for subtle luxury their own staple piece. Mirroring the Cloudgate installment in Chicago (though the two aren’t necessarily related), the Bean collection is a simple and cute design that embodies Peretti’s fascination with mirroring and unique, flowing shapes.

Since working with Tiffany, she has created more than one thousand pieces for the brand, all of which are simultaneously Tiffany and Peretti, giving us an insight into just how connected and in-sync the two are. According to the Tiffany and Co.'s website: “Her organic, sensual forms revolutionized jewelry design and seduced the world.”

Because Elsa Peretti’s designs are such a staple to the Tiffany and Co. brand, a new 20-year contract that ensured Peretti’s continued work with Tiffany was signed in 2013—giving us another 16 or so years to enjoy this design powerhouse’s beautiful designs.


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